College Football Head Impact Study Suggests Steps to Reduce Risk

August 5, 2015

 The U.Va. players in the study suffered the most frequent head impacts during games, but as the amount of padding increased during practices, so did the frequency and cumulative effect of head impacts.  (Photo: Sanjay Suchak)

The U.Va. players in the study suffered the most frequent head impacts during games, but as the amount of padding increased during practices, so did the frequency and cumulative effect of head impacts.

(Photo: Sanjay Suchak)

"Despite growing concerns about concussions, the NCAA has not regulated full-contact football practices, arguing that there’s insufficient data available about head impacts. A new study from the University of Virginia School of Medicine begins to address that lack of data, detailing the number and severity of sub-concussive head impacts over the course of an entire season.

The researchers conclude that the NCAA’s lack of regulation comes at a cost to college players that seems 'unnecessarily high' and call for changes to reduce head impacts.

'Unlike the proactive approach of the NFL [which has enacted practice rules to limit head injuries], the NCAA has been waiting for data to support their evolving football guidelines and regulations,' said lead researcher Dr. Jason Druzgal of U.Va.’s Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging. 'The results of our study start to provide some of that data.'"

Read the full press release from UVA Today here.

Posted on October 27, 2015 .